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CHEYENNE – Loretta Lynn performed at Cheyenne Frontier Days only once, but her back-to-back night shows on July 22-23, 1974, were reportedly i…

CASPER – Amid a lull in new efforts to harness Wyoming’s powerful winds, several projects approved in recent years have since been completed.

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CHEYENNE – Despite the stated concerns of the lawyer who is likely to be Wyoming’s next sole member of the U.S. House of Representatives, lawyers who oppose her campaign rhetoric said in inter…

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Wednesday, October 05, 2022
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The noxious invasive weed whitetop, which has colonized vast tracts of the West with its pale flower clusters, has long confounded landowners and resource managers. Also known as hoary cress, the plant proliferates quickly, has no natural Nor…

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CASPER – Early on the morning of July 17, 2019, an irrigation tunnel in eastern Wyoming caved in, opening a sinkhole large enough to swallow a home. Water could no longer move forward, and as it backed up, a canal near Fort Laramie filled unt…

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Interior Secretary Deb Haaland has announced an expansion of a National Park Service historical site dedicated to the massacre by U.S. troops of more than 200 Native Americans in what is now southeastern Colorado. Haaland, the first Native Am…

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Loretta Lynn, the Kentucky coal miner’s daughter who became a pillar of country music, has died. Lynn's family said she died Tuesday at her home in Tennessee. She was 90. Her compositions reflected her pride in her humble background and spoke frankly of her experiences as a woman and mother in Appalachia on such hits as “Coal Miner’s Daughter," “You Ain’t Woman Enough” and “The Pill.” Her bestselling 1976 autobiography was made into a movie, with Sissy Spacek winning an Oscar for her portrayal of Lynn. Lynn wrote unfiltered songs about sex and love, cheating husbands, divorce and birth control that sometimes got her in trouble with radio programmers.

When chronically homeless people were moved off of Denver's streets and into apartments, they were far less likely to end up in hospital emergency rooms or jail. But they still died at the same rate as those who lived outside. The Colorado Sun reports that's the grim finding from a new study of Denver’s social impact bond program, which sends outreach workers to find the highest users of taxpayer-funded services including hospitals, detox centers and the jail. Researchers concluded that a few years in supportive housing was not enough to reverse the long-term health effects and stress of being homeless, which often include mental health problems and addiction.

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The Wyoming State Bar declined to initiate a disciplinary investigation into Harriet Hageman, a natural resources attorney, in July after another lawyer filed a grievance against the congressional candidate, according to records shared with WyoFile.

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