In his March 16 editorial, Sen. John Barrasso criticized the Green New Deal as not feasible. It must be feasible. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says we “have only 20 years before there’s no turning back.” (nrdc.org)

We can help finance the Green New Deal by rescinding Trump’s tax cuts and employing Elizabeth Warren’s tax plan. According to nytimes.com, the tax cuts aren’t paying for themselves – in 2018, the U.S. Treasury brought in more money than before, but it was less than the Treasury would have gotten if the tax cuts had not been legislated.

Also, Barrasso’s statement, “Since passing tax reform, the economy has added 3 million new jobs” is a faulty cause-effect relationship. Forbes.com states, “it doesn’t appear that companies are hiring much faster than they would have without the tax cuts.” Huffpost.com reports Elizabeth Warren’s plan for a “'wealth’ tax on Americans worth more than $50 million” was popular, even with Republicans, in three online polls: “support … ranges between 50 and 61 percent.”

Barrasso states, “There are times the wind doesn’t blow and the sun doesn’t shine.” Turbines can only work when there’s wind, but electricity can still be generated by “hydro, solar, geothermal, biomass and, in the future, wave and tidal power.” (waihekewind.co.nz) Solar panels still collect energy on cloudy days. “Net metering and solar-plus storage technology allow your solar panel system to access electricity overnight when solar panel production is dormant, either through connection to the electric grid or to a battery.” (waihekewind.co.nz)

Barrasso's statistics are misleading when he says the U.S. emitted “just 13 percent of global carbon emissions [while] China and India emitted 34 percent.” A better comparison would be per capita emissions. In 2017, the total world population was 7.5 billion. The U.S. population was .3257 billion, or 4.34% of the world population. The population of China and India combined is 2.725 billion (1.386 and 1.339, respectively) which amounts to 36.3% of the world population. Therefore, only 4.3% of world population produces 13% of global emissions, while 36.3% produces 34%, so per capita, the U.S. produces three times more emissions than China and India.

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